Visual Arts

Joy Pratt Markham Gallery

The Joy Pratt Markham Gallery presents exhibitions of works by both emerging and internationally recognized artists. You're invited to explore new perspectives on nature, identity and community.

PLEASE NOTE: Joy Pratt Markham Gallery is currently being utilized as part of our annual Holidaze event. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE.

Joy Pratt Markham Gallery Hours

Monday-FRIDAY | 10AM to 2pm
Gallery will open 90 MINUTES prior to most performances and remain open up to FINAL CURTAIN OF most performances
Gallery admission is free

Private gallery tours may be scheduled in advance by emailing visualarts@waltonartscenter.org. Please arrange your tour at your earliest convenience. We request three business days’ notice to schedule tour guides.

Support for Walton Arts Center Visual Arts is generously provided by the Windgate Foundation and Friends of Walton Arts Center.

Windgate Foundation logo

Future Exhibitions

  • Coming soon ...

Current Exhibitions

 

Listening Objects 

By Steve Parker - artist, musician, curator
Click here to view Steve Parker's bio

Listening Objects, a project by artist, musician, and curator, Steve Parker is inspired by the practice of Deep Listening, developed by the late composer Pauline Oliveros, using sculpture to engage people in the art of listening.  At the heart of this project is the creation of interactive sound sculptures that facilitate the simple, yet overlooked, act of focused listening. These objects are to be enjoyed by people of all ages and will be on exhibition in front of Walton Arts Center's Administrative Offices at 255 N. School Ave, in  Fayetteville.

Listening Objects outdoor exhibit 

Tubascopes
  • The Tubascope is a sculpture that originally worked like a telescope for your ears, but has been modified to live only as visual sculpture due to COVID-19. Modeled after obsolete acoustic locators of the 1930s, the Tubascope is made from reclaimed and repurposed brass instruments and copper tubing. Rather than produce music, the sculpture invites the viewer to engage in the simple act of focused listening.

 Click here to learn more about Tubascopes

Listening Objects has been made possible through the generosity of a Mid-America Arts Alliance's Artistic Innovations Grant, with additional funding, exhibition space and support provided by Artosphere - Arkansas' Arts + Nature Festival, Walton Arts Center, INTERFORM, The City of Springdale, Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, Downtown Springdale Alliance, Arts Center of the Ozarks, and Scott Family Amazeum.

TOPO Map for School Avenue

Topo Map body image

On display throughout 2018 and beyond

This is a temporary public art installation made of thermoplastic by artist Stacy Levy. City of Fayetteville and Walton Arts Center commissioned the artwork with support from the National Endowment for the Arts. Its form is a life-scale topographic map of the terrain between Dickson and Mountain Streets and a visual reminder of the issues of water in Fayetteville’s hilly landscape.

Check out a video that explains how the installation was created and the inspiration behind it!

Learn even more about TOPO Map.

Learn about the wonderful Intermission Mural in our lobby!

Listening Objects 

By Steve Parker - artist, musician, curator
Click here to view Steve Parker's bio

Listening Objects, a project by artist, musician, and curator, Steve Parker is inspired by the practice of Deep Listening, developed by the late composer Pauline Oliveros, using sculpture to engage people in the art of listening.  At the heart of this project is the creation of interactive sound sculptures that facilitate the simple, yet overlooked, act of focused listening. These objects are to be enjoyed by people of all ages and will be on exhibition in front of Walton Arts Center's Administrative Offices at 255 N. School Ave, in  Fayetteville.

Listening Objects at Walton Arts Center features Tubascopes

  • The Tubascope is a sculpture that originally worked like a telescope for your ears, but has been modified to live only as visual sculpture due to COVID-19. Modeled after obsolete acoustic locators of the 1930s, the Tubascope is made from reclaimed and repurposed brass instruments and copper tubing. Rather than produce music, the sculpture invites the viewer to engage in the simple act of focused listening.

Listening Objects has been made possible through the generosity of a Mid-America Arts Alliance's Artistic Innovations Grant, with additional funding, exhibition space and support provided by Artosphere - Arkansas' Arts + Nature Festival, Walton Arts Center, INTERFORM, The City of Springdale, Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, Downtown Springdale Alliance, Arts Center of the Ozarks, and Scott Family Amazeum.

Click here to learn more about Tubascopes